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Make power point presentation and notes for slides

Topic

The impact of nutrition and health on productivity.  Convince the audience (board of directors) that they must act on your recommendation.

Powerpoint Slide Presentation –

The Powerpoint slide presentation should include:

· a cover slide, with all the information noted in the template.

· Notes section should include suitable introductory remarks

· an agenda slide

· Notes section should include short notes on each agenda point

· a minimum of six content slides – maximum of nine content slides (in addition to the cover slide and agenda slide i.e. they are not counted here) – representing the content of the presentation, including APA in-text citations ON EACH SLIDE

· Notes section for each slide should include complete information that needs to be presented in full sentences with appropriate spelling, grammar, punctuation and sentence structure.

I expect to see at least one data chart with quantifiable data and a detailed explanation in the notes section.

I should see 150-250 words in the notes section PER SLIDE.

There should be one or more final slides which reproduce the reference page containing your source information (APA format). This should be a revised version of the reference page submitted in Week Seven with possible additional entries added.

Notes submission

Copy (i.e. cut and paste) the Notes section from each powerpoint slide to a Word document and submit the Word document to the same Dropbox.  The purpose of this is to have it examined by Turnitin.  Plagiarized submissions will be given a grade of zero.  The student will have a chance to resubmit with the resulting grade multiplied by 0.5.

Use this as Outline

1. Impacts of COVID-19 on global poverty, food security, and diets.

2. Health initiatives can boost staff productivity

Use this Reference

Impacts of Covid-19 on global … – wiley online library. (n.d.). Retrieved March 5, 2022, from

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/agec.12624

Guardian News and Media. (2015, August 28). Wellness in the workplace: How health initiatives can boost staff productivity. The Guardian. Retrieved March 4, 2022, from

https://www.theguardian.com/small-business-network/2015/aug/28/wellness-workplace-health-initiatives-boost-staff-productivity

Presentation title here

Date

First and last names of contributors

Liz Clarke (LC) – Put simple, useful information on the cover slide. Your presentation title, the date of the presentation and the names of the people who contributed.

Agenda

Liz Clarke (LC) – The first slide after the title slide should be an agenda slide. This slide lists the topics covered, in order.

First Topic

Second Topic

Third Topic

Put A Title On Each Slide

Slide Titles: 

Each slide should have a text title across the top (Smith, 2019)

The title might be the only text on the screen (Smith, 2019)

Liz Clarke (LC) – This is the first slide with actual content. Make sure each slide that follows had a title.

Keep It Simple

Liz Clarke (LC) – Of all the space on the PowerPoint “canvas”, only 25% of it should have text on it.

Liz Clarke (LC) – Keep the background simple and clean.

The ratio of text to graphic information = 25% text : 75% graphics/blank space (Clarke, 2017)

There should NEVER be a slide filled with writing (Clarke, 2017) 

Optimize Each Channel

Spoken Word (Presenter’s voice)

Connects with audience

Explains details

Providing context – tells the story

Visual (Powerpoint, charts, graphs, text)

Data (numbers, percentages, dates, facts)

Graphics to illustrate spoken words

Short bursts of text

Therefore:

Spoken Word (Presenter’s voice)

Does not explain numbers without visual reinforcement

Show numbers, don’t just speak them

Visual (Powerpoint, charts, graphs)

Should never be filled with text

5

Bullet Points

Limit to three per slide (Clarke, 2017)

Use parallel grammar, always (Clarke, 2017)

No Errors

PROOFREAD – PROOFREAD – PROOFREAD (Clarke, 2017)

Butter Tarts Are Amazing!

67% of Canadians eat at least one butter tart per month. (Clarke, 2016)

Every fact needs a source.

Every image needs a source.

(Image: Butter Tarts, 2010)

Butter Tart Consumption Rates

All data needs a source.

(Source: Butter Tart Research Foundation, 2016.)

Y Axis Label – Units of Measure

Liz Clarke (LC) – Presenting data in graphic format is very powerful. Do this when ever you can.

Sources (in APA)

Butter Tarts [Digital Image]. (2010). Retrieved from

http://www.canadianliving.com/food/baking-and-desserts/recipe/best-butter-tarts

Clarke, L. (2017) Powerpoint Template Discussion. Unpublished.

Clarke, L. (2018) An Ode to Butter Tarts. Unpublished.

Smith, S. (2019) Fake APA Entry. Fake Publication. Norwood: Fake Publishing Company.

Chart1

Category 1 Category 1 Category 1
Category 2 Category 2 Category 2
Category 3 Category 3 Category 3
Category 4 Category 4 Category 4
Series 1
Series 2
Series 3
4.3
2.4
2
2.5
4.4
2
3.5
1.8
3
4.5
2.8
5

Sheet1

Series 1 Series 2 Series 3
Category 1 4.3 2.4 2
Category 2 2.5 4.4 2
Category 3 3.5 1.8 3
Category 4 4.5 2.8 5

Canada & Turkey

A retrospective on Issues affecting business relationships & predictions for the future

Very good student BUSN733-002

Hello everyone, thank you so much for joining me! My name is (insert name) and I am here today to cover a very intriguing topic! As you all may know, the growing Turkish economy has become of interest to Canada over the years, and the opportunities that exist for both countries in terms of commercial business and international trade should be explored further. In this presentation I will discuss the business relationships between the regions of Canada and Turkey, to examine the main issues they have experienced in the last several years, as well as to make educated inferences regarding the future of the relationship based on the research conducted. So, let’s begin with a brief overview of the presentation.

Images obtained from: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flag_of_Canada and https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flag_of_Turkey

1

agenda

Main Issues

Friction among Canadian and Turkish Governments

Compulsory education delays in Turkey and impacts on the economy

Political disagreements caused by NATO tensions

Timeline of significant events

Predictions for future

Conclusion

References

Questions

2

First, I will cover cover the main issues affecting Canada and Turkey throughout the last decade, with an in depth look at each issue. The first issue being the friction among the governments of these nations. The second issue discussed will be related to the compulsory education policies in Turkey and how this impacted the economy and their relationship with Canada. The final issue will cover the political disputes that existed among the nations due to the turbulent start in NATO. Following the issues, I will discuss a brief timeline of significant events and how they have changed relations in the last decade. Then, I will cover the predictions for the future relationship between Turkey and Canada. I will do a brief wrap up of what we have learned, then I will present the references, and open it up to you for any questions you may have. Without further ado, let’s begin with an overview of the main issues affecting the relationships between Turkey and Canada.

2

ISSUE 1
Friction between Governments due to delayed recognition of Armenian genocide in 1915 (Delvoie, 2011).

3

Main issues

Image obtained from: https://twitter.com/canadaturkeybc

To begin with, the first issue I will cover is the turbulent relationship that existed for a large period of time among the Turkish and Canadian governments.

The 1915 Armenian Genocide was a major contributor to the weak relationship between these countries. Although Canada recognized the existence of the Armenian genocide in 2004, the Government of Canada did not formally acknowledge it until 2015 (Delvoie, 2011). This caused tensions as the Turkish people were not satisfied with the lack of recognition. In 2015, the Canadian government chose to make April 24th Armenian Genocide Remembrance Day, although the damage had already been done over this period of time where Canada refused to formally make the acknowledgement of the genocide (Delvoie, 2011). This delayed recognition of the genocide by Canada’s government caused friction between the two country’s governments, weakening their potential relationship. If this had been resolved earlier, the two countries could have been benefiting from a positive mutual business relationship much sooner.

3

Issue 2
In Turkey, 12 year compulsory education policy not in place until 2012 (Kilford, 2015).
Delayed economic growth due to limited knowledge gains and entrepreneurial advancement (Demirci, 2013).

Main issues

4

Image obtained from: https://favpng.com/png_view/teacher-teacher-graphic-design-logo-education-vector-graphics-png/mUaJ5QRT

 The second issue I would like to mention is the delay in Turkey’s enforcement of a compulsory education policy which contributed to its delayed economic growth and to Canada’s hesitation becoming their business partner. Prior to the 2000’s, the Turkish economy experienced slow growth due to people’s poor understanding of Turkish markets (Demirci, 2013). Prior to 2012, there was only an eight year mandatory education policy in place in Turkey, which limited economic knowledge gains and entrepreneurial advancement (Kilford, 2015). As we have seen, entrepreneurship is tightly linked to the growth of economies by job creation, and there is the general belief that entrepreneurs can be taught by formal education (Demirci, 2013). Therefore, this delay in a full 12 year compulsory education policy may have stunted the growth of the Turkish economy. This setback served as a barrier to the partnership, as it discouraged Canada’s support while Turkey was not economically feasible.

4

Issue 3
Canada strongly objects to Turkey becoming a member of NATO (Delvoie, 2011).
Political disputes ensued and dissuaded international trade (Delvoie, 2011).

5

MAIN ISSUES

Image obtained from: https://www.nato.int/nato-welcome/index.html

The third major issue I would like to discuss is the presence of tensions that existed prior to the conception of the Turkish NATO membership. Canada strongly objected to Turkey being a part of NATO, and therefore there were political disputes between the two nations (Delvoie, 2011). One of the reasons Canada opposed Turkey joining was the belief that NATO might receive criticism for first and formally being a military alliance with the inclusion of Turkey (Delvoie, 2011). This strained relationship continued when Canada withdrew land and air forces from Europe after the Cold War in 1992. Turkey was among the countries that attacked Canada’s decision to withdraw (Delvoie, 2011). The tension continued to rise when Turkey sold obsolete F-86 fighter jets (which it had received from Canada) to Pakistan without Canadian knowledge or permission (Delvoie, 2011). This poor relationship dissuaded international trade and growth for some time, and although Turkey did eventually become a member of NATO, these disagreements established negative relationships that were difficult to overcome.

5

Timeline of significant events

Prior to 2000

NATO

Political disputes (Delvoie, 2011).

2004

Turbulent relations due to Canada’s lack of formal recognition of Armenian genocide (Delvoie, 2011).

2009 2010

Following the recession, Canada looks to diversify international relations (Delvoie, 2011).

2013

Political stability and economic growth in Turkey (Building Bridges, 2013).

2019

Established Joint Economic and Trade Committee (Government of Canada, 2019).

Consulates open in each country in major cities of Toronto and Istanbul (Building Bridges, 2013).

Canadian hesitancy to partner with Turkey (Demirci, 2013).

Talks of formal Free Trade Agreement (Building Bridges, 2013).

Now, I will review a timeline of significant events that bring us to today.

Prior to the 2000’s, there were political tensions that existed between Turkey and Canada that were further strained by Canada’s objection to Turkey joining NATO (Delvoie, 2011). Due to Turkey’s lack of economic growth or knowledge of the markets, Canada was hesitant to partner with them to conduct business (Demirci, 2013). In 2004, the Canadian Government recognized the Armenian genocide of 1915, but it was not until 2015 that it would be formally recognized – a fact that caused turmoil with Turkey (Delvoie, 2011). After the recession hit in 2008, Canada had to diversify into new markets to recover, and so they looked to Turkey to expand their international trade partnerships (Delvoie, 2011). In 2010, Turkey opened a consulate in Toronto, and Canada opened one in Istanbul, showing a large presence in a major city of each country and a sign of mutual agreement to the relationship (Building Bridges, 2013). From 2013 onward, Turkey experienced growth in their economy and political stability. Some of the growth was attributed to the 2012 establishment of the 12 year compulsory education policy as I mentioned previously (Kilford, 2015). This growth led to Canadians recognizing the importance of the relationship for trade, and in 2013 there were talks beginning for the formation of a Free Trade Agreement (Building Bridges, 2013).

In 2019, the two countries signed a memorandum of understanding for the establishment of a Joint Economic and Trade Committee (JETC), which indicates a continued positive trade and business relationship (Government of Canada, 2019).

6

7

Data retrieved from Government of Canada (2020)

Now, I will show you some data on the imports from Turkey and the exports to Turkey taken from Government of Canada (2020), showing data for the last 5 years. The currency is Canadian dollars seen on the vertical axis, with amounts shown in 100,000’s, (on the scale of billions of dollars). The horizontal axis shows the comparison of exports shown in blue, and imports shown in grey, year to year. If we start by looking at the blue, at exports, you can see a fairly modest albeit present increase over the years. In 2015, it starts at about $1.1 billion. Then, by 2019, it had increased to about $1.6 billion (Government of Canada, 2020).

Now, looking at the grey for imports, there also has been an increase year after year, with the exception of the period between 2018 and 2019. However, in general the trend is increasing. In 2015, the imports were valued at $1.3 billion, and by 2019 it had grown to just under $2 billion, with a peak in 2018 of $2.3 billion (Government of Canada, 2020). Overall, these figures indicate a growing trade relationship between Turkey and Canada, with very positive indications of future growth to come if these trends continue.

7

Imports and Exports from Canadian Perspective

Exports 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 1126 1152 1265 1329 1617 Imports 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 1293 1367 1785 2337 1964

Year

Amount ($100,000’s ) (CAD)

Increased imports and exports

Opportunity to focus on exports

Establish Free Trade Agreement

(Building Bridges, 2013)

Turkey to act as commercial bridge for Canada to the East (Government of Canada, 2019).

8

Predictions for Future

Image obtained from: https://www.nato.int/nato-welcome/index.html

Now to continue with future predictions for the business relationships between Turkey and Canada, and what this might mean. We have learned that Turkey is rapidly growing in population, as well as in the access they have to formal education, and economic growth as a result (Kilford, 2015). In recent years, Turkey has experienced greater political stability and economic success due to increased foreign direct investment (Building Bridges, 2013). Turkey has aligned its laws to match the European Union, which has resulted in a more independent economy, and has moved from a military political system to more of a democracy (Building Bridges, 2013). These factors all indicate the positive direction of Turkey’s economy and creation of a more desirable partner for Canada to conduct relations with. In the last five years, Canada has realized the value of Turkey as a trading partner, and the benefits they can expect from expanding the trading capabilities (Delvoie, 2011). From these facts, it is predicted that in the next 10 years there will be an increase in overall imports and exports between the two nations, with a specific focus on exports from Canada as an area of opportunity. Specifically, Turkey is in need of agricultural products and food that Canada can supply; and can take advantage of Canada’s position as a leader in the mining industry (Building Bridges, 2013). Canada in turn can benefit from Turkey’s advantageous location, as Turkey can serve as a gateway for Canada to establish relations with other European and Asian countries (Government of Canada, 2019). As Turkey has great access to a number of countries, Canada’s commercial sector could benefit greatly by establishing subsidiaries in Turkey, and then appealing to a much wider market. The establishment of a Free Trade Agreement would be the next step in solidifying relations between Turkey and Canada (Building Bridges, 2013).

8

Despite some past differences, the future is positive for Turkish – Canadian business relations (Building Bridges, 2013).

Focus is on trade, particularly in agriculture, mining, and infrastructure (Building Bridges, 2013).

Commercial opportunities
exist given Turkey’s strategic
location between Canada
and the East (Government
of Canada, 2019).

9

conclusion

Image obtained from: https://www.nato.int/nato-welcome/index.html

In conclusion, the past relationships between Turkey and Canada have had positives and negatives. Although Turkey had slow economic growth in the early 2000’s, the recent years have shown very promising growth. This growth has appealed to Canada, and made them see the benefits to having Turkey as a close business partner. The future will focus on trade, particularly with regards to Canadian exports of products related to agriculture, mining, and infrastructure (Building Bridges, 2013). Canada will benefit from the connections that Turkey can provide to other parts of the Eastern hemisphere (Government of Canada, 2019). Although there has been some turmoil in the past relationships between these two countries, the future for them is bright and the possibilities are endless.

9

10

References

Building Bridges: Canada-Turkey Relations and Beyond. (2013). Standing Senate Committee on Foreign Affairs and International Trade . Retrieved from https://sencanada.ca/content/sen/Committee/411/aefa/rep/rep13jun13-e.pdf

Delvoie, L. A. (2011). Canada and Turkey Rethinking the Relationship. Centre for International and Defence Policy. Retrieved from https://www.queensu.ca/cidp/sites/webpublish.queensu.ca.cidpwww/files/files/publications/occasi onalpapers/OP65(1).pdf

Demirci, A. E. (2013). Cross-cultural differences in entrepreneurial tendencies: an exploratory view in Turkey and Canada. International Journal of Entrepreneurship, 17, 21+. Retrieved from https://link-gale- com.ezcentennial.ocls.ca/apps/doc/A332655998/ITBC?u=ko_acd_cec&sid=ITBC&xid=3659b077

Government of Canada. (2019, June). Canada – Turkey Relations. Retrieved from https://www.canadainternational.gc.ca/turkey-turquie/bilateral_relations_bilaterales/canada- turkey-turquie.aspx?lang=eng

Government of Canada. (2020, February). Fact Sheet – Turkey. Retrieved from https://www.canadainternational.gc.ca/turkey- turquie/bilateral_relations_bilaterales/fs_turkey_fd.aspx?lang=eng

Kilford, C. R. (2015). The development and future of Canadian–Turkish relations. Canadian Foreign Policy Journal, 22(1), 69–83. doi: 10.1080/11926422.2015.1083873

All of the references used for the information you received here today were taken from peer-reviewed scholarly articles or the Government of Canada website. Much of the information taken was to give a clear picture regarding the past and the events leading to where Turkey and Canada relations are now. The future predictions were based on the last article by Kilford (2015), as well as some predictions from the first article Building Bridges (2013).

10

Thank you!

Questions?

11

That concludes my presentation. Thank you for your attention today! Please take this time to ask me any questions you may have.

11

Canada & Turkey

A retrospective on Issues affecting business relationships & predictions for the future

Very good student BUSN733-002

Hello everyone, thank you so much for joining me! My name is (insert name) and I am here today to cover a very intriguing topic! As you all may know, the growing Turkish economy has become of interest to Canada over the years, and the opportunities that exist for both countries in terms of commercial business and international trade should be explored further. In this presentation I will discuss the business relationships between the regions of Canada and Turkey, to examine the main issues they have experienced in the last several years, as well as to make educated inferences regarding the future of the relationship based on the research conducted. So, let’s begin with a brief overview of the presentation.

Images obtained from: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flag_of_Canada and https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flag_of_Turkey

1

agenda

Main Issues

Friction among Canadian and Turkish Governments

Compulsory education delays in Turkey and impacts on the economy

Political disagreements caused by NATO tensions

Timeline of significant events

Predictions for future

Conclusion

References

Questions

2

First, I will cover cover the main issues affecting Canada and Turkey throughout the last decade, with an in depth look at each issue. The first issue being the friction among the governments of these nations. The second issue discussed will be related to the compulsory education policies in Turkey and how this impacted the economy and their relationship with Canada. The final issue will cover the political disputes that existed among the nations due to the turbulent start in NATO. Following the issues, I will discuss a brief timeline of significant events and how they have changed relations in the last decade. Then, I will cover the predictions for the future relationship between Turkey and Canada. I will do a brief wrap up of what we have learned, then I will present the references, and open it up to you for any questions you may have. Without further ado, let’s begin with an overview of the main issues affecting the relationships between Turkey and Canada.

2

ISSUE 1
Friction between Governments due to delayed recognition of Armenian genocide in 1915 (Delvoie, 2011).

3

Main issues

Image obtained from: https://twitter.com/canadaturkeybc

To begin with, the first issue I will cover is the turbulent relationship that existed for a large period of time among the Turkish and Canadian governments.

The 1915 Armenian Genocide was a major contributor to the weak relationship between these countries. Although Canada recognized the existence of the Armenian genocide in 2004, the Government of Canada did not formally acknowledge it until 2015 (Delvoie, 2011). This caused tensions as the Turkish people were not satisfied with the lack of recognition. In 2015, the Canadian government chose to make April 24th Armenian Genocide Remembrance Day, although the damage had already been done over this period of time where Canada refused to formally make the acknowledgement of the genocide (Delvoie, 2011). This delayed recognition of the genocide by Canada’s government caused friction between the two country’s governments, weakening their potential relationship. If this had been resolved earlier, the two countries could have been benefiting from a positive mutual business relationship much sooner.

3

Issue 2
In Turkey, 12 year compulsory education policy not in place until 2012 (Kilford, 2015).
Delayed economic growth due to limited knowledge gains and entrepreneurial advancement (Demirci, 2013).

Main issues

4

Image obtained from: https://favpng.com/png_view/teacher-teacher-graphic-design-logo-education-vector-graphics-png/mUaJ5QRT

 The second issue I would like to mention is the delay in Turkey’s enforcement of a compulsory education policy which contributed to its delayed economic growth and to Canada’s hesitation becoming their business partner. Prior to the 2000’s, the Turkish economy experienced slow growth due to people’s poor understanding of Turkish markets (Demirci, 2013). Prior to 2012, there was only an eight year mandatory education policy in place in Turkey, which limited economic knowledge gains and entrepreneurial advancement (Kilford, 2015). As we have seen, entrepreneurship is tightly linked to the growth of economies by job creation, and there is the general belief that entrepreneurs can be taught by formal education (Demirci, 2013). Therefore, this delay in a full 12 year compulsory education policy may have stunted the growth of the Turkish economy. This setback served as a barrier to the partnership, as it discouraged Canada’s support while Turkey was not economically feasible.

4

Issue 3
Canada strongly objects to Turkey becoming a member of NATO (Delvoie, 2011).
Political disputes ensued and dissuaded international trade (Delvoie, 2011).

5

MAIN ISSUES

Image obtained from: https://www.nato.int/nato-welcome/index.html

The third major issue I would like to discuss is the presence of tensions that existed prior to the conception of the Turkish NATO membership. Canada strongly objected to Turkey being a part of NATO, and therefore there were political disputes between the two nations (Delvoie, 2011). One of the reasons Canada opposed Turkey joining was the belief that NATO might receive criticism for first and formally being a military alliance with the inclusion of Turkey (Delvoie, 2011). This strained relationship continued when Canada withdrew land and air forces from Europe after the Cold War in 1992. Turkey was among the countries that attacked Canada’s decision to withdraw (Delvoie, 2011). The tension continued to rise when Turkey sold obsolete F-86 fighter jets (which it had received from Canada) to Pakistan without Canadian knowledge or permission (Delvoie, 2011). This poor relationship dissuaded international trade and growth for some time, and although Turkey did eventually become a member of NATO, these disagreements established negative relationships that were difficult to overcome.

5

Timeline of significant events

Prior to 2000

NATO

Political disputes (Delvoie, 2011).

2004

Turbulent relations due to Canada’s lack of formal recognition of Armenian genocide (Delvoie, 2011).

2009 2010

Following the recession, Canada looks to diversify international relations (Delvoie, 2011).

2013

Political stability and economic growth in Turkey (Building Bridges, 2013).

2019

Established Joint Economic and Trade Committee (Government of Canada, 2019).

Consulates open in each country in major cities of Toronto and Istanbul (Building Bridges, 2013).

Canadian hesitancy to partner with Turkey (Demirci, 2013).

Talks of formal Free Trade Agreement (Building Bridges, 2013).

Now, I will review a timeline of significant events that bring us to today.

Prior to the 2000’s, there were political tensions that existed between Turkey and Can